Taking Time to Prepare

Whether you have a spiritual practice or not you’re probably familiar with the celebration of Easter which happens later this month. For those who celebrate Easter as a spiritual holiday, they’re currently going through a period called Lent, or some 40 days of mental and spiritual preparation before the actual celebration of Easter.

Preparation is something that should be a regular part of all of our lives, spiritual or not. We aren’t born ready for most things in our lives, we have to learn them or get ready for them. Sometimes that takes years of preparation and experiences to get to the point of being prepared to do something or be someone. There’s a reason that we vet the big leaders and people we hire (or we’re supposed to), so that we know we’ve got someone qualified and not just some random individual off the streets.

Part of preparation is planning ahead.  Sometimes that means just anticipating how things may happen in the future and being mentally (and financially) prepared for that, other times it means doing certain things first or doing things in a certain order so that you’re ready.  A great example is baking bread.  Bread isn’t a one-step process, you don’t just mix all the ingredients together in a random order and it’s done, you’re never done until you bake it, and most breads have several steps including a rest period and have to be baked.

I know we sometimes wish we could skip all the preparation and planning steps, but in many cases they make it easier to work through things when they finally happen and make it easier to deal with everything else that’s going on in our lives at the same time.  Don’t ignore the necessity and importance and value of taking the time to prepare. Taking that time can make things go easier and more successfully for you in the future.

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The Future of Your Business

Lately I’ve been coming back to a topic that isn’t one that we really like to think about, but is something that affects us personally and professionally: death. At some point in time all of us will die, and just about every business will go out of business at some point in time. Very few businesses stand the test of time, often because the world changes and either they can’t keep up with the changes, or there’s no one to continue on after the current owners are done with the business. So today I thought we’d take a minute to talk about next steps with your business, whether you’re hoping to sell, planning to pass it on or some day going to close up shop.

Whether you’re planning to sell or planning to pass it on one of the most important things you can do to not only make your business appealing to the next person, but to ensure that you pass along the best version of your business that you can, is to keep good records. This means that not only is everything recorded in a way that people can easily figure out what you’re sharing, but the information can be used to make important decisions in the future and the information shows that you’ve got a great concept and the customer base to support the business.

If you’re planning to close up shop some day one of the most important things you can do now and when that time comes is have good resources that you can pass your people off to. I’ve been connected with several individuals and companies who decided to close their doors and left absolutely no way for people to keep in touch with them or suggestions about who they can connect with that offers the same heart, quality and services that they did to now replace them. I understand if you want to be done with your business (or need to be), but you’ve spent a lot of time building trust with people and they’ve gotten to know you and see you as a valuable resource, so to just toss them out like garbage just because you’re done is inconsiderate. You’ve got a new future you’re moving on to, but they were relying on you for parts of their future.

But the fact is that paying attention to detail, keeping good records, building a network of reliable customers, having data to consider, and having a network of people you can recommend people to are things that can be invaluable now while your business is being built, growing or thriving, not just when you’re closing that chapter of your life.

The one last thing I would encourage you to keep in mind is that everything does come to an end at some time. It’s always better if you’ve got the control to finish things out as you want them to go, rather than working through a mess or leaving the mess for someone else. What plans do you have for the future of your business?

Summer of Change

Summer is a great time to work on change with your kids and family. Why? Because most of us have lighter schedules that allow for taking a little time off to do those big projects, weather that allows both indoor and outdoor activities and plans to be done, less things on the schedule and more opportunities to put in a little time each day to work on those changes, and an abundance of people home from college who can watch the kids if you and your partner need to work independently of the kids on something. It’s not always easy to work on change, but having the abundant resources that the summer provides to work on changes does make it a little easier and remove many of the excuses you’ve been using to hold yourself back.

Why work on changes? Because whether it’s the mile-long to-do list that you’ve been adding to for too long, or the stuff that’s just sticking around bothering you or holding you back, neither is good for your family or you personally. If you’re familiar with the concepts of Feng Shui, the law of attraction and the laws of abundance, they also speak to the importance of having a space that allows you to think, grow, love, create and prosper, which aren’t things you can do if you’re feeling pressured by that to-do list or all the stuff just hanging around.

Also, if it’s on your to-do list it must be there for a reason. Sometimes we do put things on there that we think we’re supposed to put there, but most often it’s stuff that really does need to be there, even if we end up doing the lower priority stuff first because it’s less intimidating, or less of a commitment, or less of a change.

So what are the big changes you might work on this summer? Organizing clothes, organizing the kitchen, organizing the garage/shed, cleaning up the outdoor areas, organizing the office, changing diets/eating habits, increasing exercise consistency, setting aside consistent time for personal development, making more consistent time for your partner and/or kids, reducing your bad habits (including overspending, too much TV, too much junk food, not enough sleep etc.) or even job searching (or starting a business), just to name a few.

What will you (finally) work on this summer?

Unfinished Business

As we get closer and closer to the end of this year we’ve talked about what to do with this week and how you can get ahead for 2017. For this last business post I wanted to talk about something we don’t really like to talk about: the stuff that doesn’t get done.  Often we talk about this stuff in terms of numbers of unread emails or unpaid invoices or bills to be paid.  But there are tons of other things we’ve got on our “I really need to do…,” “If I have time I’ll do…” and “Sometime I’ll…” lists.  It’s those items that I want to talk about today, especially those you’ve been putting off for years or those that you put off each year (and partially complete later).

First, know that sometimes you can just pitch it all and be done with it and there’s a really good chance you’ll never miss any of it.  I know, you may wonder what you’re missing out on, but sometimes the best thing you can do is just completely free yourself from it.  With physical items I think it’s best to go through things super quick because there may be a treasured family heirloom in the pile, but especially when it comes to emails, if it’s 5+ years old and you haven’t read it you can probably get rid of it.

But what about those to do lists?  I would go over them because there are probably potential clients you meant to get back to but haven’t, suppliers or joint venture partners you’ve been meaning to reach out to, marketing you’ve been meaning to do, marketers who you were thinking of hiring to help you or even mentors you’ve been wanting to reach out to.  Take a look at those lists and decide which of those are still things that need doing, and make the time over the next few weeks to accomplish them slowly but surely, maybe setting aside a couple of hours a week to tackle it.

Why? Because I’m reminded every so often how busy we are.  We have so much going on personally and professionally, that often we’re just doing the very best we can to keep things moving forward and some things just don’t get done as a result, even if they’re important to do.  Also, most sales aren’t made with the first contact, it can take 20 or more contacts in today’s busy world to make a sale or get that published piece in the paper or on that industry website or blog.  So I would encourage you as we finish out this year to commit to following through on what you’ve said you would do with your employees, customers and opportunities in your personal and professional life more in the coming days and year.  No, you won’t be perfect and won’t get it all done, but I know I already feel better just committing to do it, rather than thinking about adding it to another list.

The A-Game for the Win

Are you bringing your a-game each day or are you just getting by in business? I know it can be overwhelming to think about all the things that you have to get done each day, which is one reason why so many businesses don’t succeed:  when you’re trying to do everything it all ends up sub-par or not done. What if instead you focused on bringing your best to the table as often as possible? This week I want to share a few thoughts about why this is important.

First, when you don’t do your best work no one else does either. Your employees, partners and suppliers take their cues from you and when they see that you’re not really doing your best and think it’s OK for them to do the same. After all, if the boss doesn’t seem to care, why should they?

Second, you need to prioritize and plan. Both of these are things that people struggle with, partially because they don’t know how to and partially because they choose the wrong priorities or create the wrong plan. This also leads to not being open to or prepared for opportunities that come your way.

Third, bringing your a-game does mean hard work and hard choices. It’s not always easy to make the tough decisions, let people go, not take on a client, or follow the rules that have been set down, but in most cases they were set up for a reason, and it’s been shown time and again that hard work does make a difference.

Fourth, when you bring your a-game you make the decision when to hire people to give you more time to do what only you can do. In most cases things that don’t need your immediate and full-time attention like the finances and books should be hired out, because while they can’t be neglected or avoided, it’s not necessary for you to personally work on every detail of them.

But, being good means that you’ll better serve your customers, get more repeat customers and have better testimonials/word of mouth referrals. Which ultimately leads to being more successful. I don’t know too many people who are not satisfied working for or buying from A-game businesses.